Thank you Di Matteo, but it’s time for Chelsea to move on

By Amit Singh

Last week many Chelsea supporters were left shocked as Roberto Di Matteo was sacked. The former player led the club to a historic Champions League victory against Bayern Munich, making him a legend in every fans eyes and cementing his place in the Chelsea history books. An achievement which neither Ancelotti or Mourinho were capable of delivering.

Yet, the Italian was sacked. Worse still, he was replaced by Rafa Benitez, a man who has never been a favourite amongst the Chelsea faithful, whom he has taunted in the past. People were outraged that the Champions League winner could be sacked, whilst his club were third in the league and still in contention for honours. However, as unpopular view as it is, it was the right call to sack Roberto di Matteo and astute a shrewd tactician in Rafa Benitez.

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Financial prudence at Chelsea

By Amit Singh

Chelsea returned to their lavish spending habits this season spending around £80 million on new signings. This is bucking a recent trend as the club invested relatively little between 06-09 with net spends being at the low end of the Premier League for those seasons. Only after signing Torres and David Luiz did Abramovich’s spending increase once again. People will thus believe that - despite their lucrative adidas football kits sponsored by Samsung - Chelsea are flouting the Financial Fair Play, the FFP, and attempting to return to prominence by asserting themselves on the transfer market. However, there has been a shift in emphasis at Chelsea in the last few seasons, nowhere has this been more clear than in a number of high profile releases. Under Ancelotti the side let go multiple big earners such as Ballack, Deco and Carvalho and this season Meireles, Drogba, Bosingwa and Kalou were let go, many of whom earned big money.

When Abramovich first took over the club the model was spend, spend and continue spending. Between 2003-06 the club paid nearly £300m on bringing in new players, an astronomical amount for any side. Coincidently (or not so) this coincided with the clubs most successful period, domestically. The transfer policy was also incoherent. Chelsea were linked with a host of big names on a regular basis, even if they did not need them. Nowhere was this more evident than with the purchase of Andriy Shevchenko, a player Mourinho did not want, or need. Chelsea were free spending.

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